Philip Lymbery, Compassion CEO

Philip Lymbery

Dead Zone: Where the Wild Things Were

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Buy your copy of Dead Zone: Where the Wild Things Were

A global tour of some of the world’s most iconic and endangered species, and what we can do to save them.

Factory farming harms wildlife too

In 2014, your support helped us expose the devastating impact of cheap meat on the environment through the internationally-acclaimed book Farmageddon: The True Cost of Cheap Meat.

Dead Zone: Where the Wild Things Were is the next step on this crucial journey. In this book, our CEO Philip Lymbery explores how factory farming is harming wildlife around the world. Through the lens of a dozen iconic and endangered species, Dead Zone examines the role of industrial farming in their plight and meets the people doing something about it.

Buy now

You can buy the book from the following retailers:

Or order it instore from most good bookstores.

Remember to leave a review on Amazon once you’ve read it and let us know what you think!

If you haven’t read Farmageddon yet, you can order it here.

Also available: Farmageddon in pictures (use discount code "FARMAGEDDON" at the checkout for 30% off), the true cost of cheap meat in bite-sized pieces!

Join our campaign for fairer food and farming

Intensive farming causes immense harm to wildlife and is one of the biggest drivers of species extinction and biodiversity loss on the planet. We must stop this ruthless destruction before it is too late – but we need your help. Enter your email address to allow Compassion in World Farming to send you urgent campaign actions and news (you can unsubscribe at any time).

 


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Welcome

Compassion in World Farming campaigns to end factory farming. My new book, Dead Zone, explores the links between factory farming and the demise of our iconic wildlife, and what we can do to save it.

Philip Lymbery

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You wouldn’t know that this is going on… you wouldn’t know that it’s part of industrial farming