• Intensive pig farming

    The shift away from traditional pig farming to large-scale intensive methods has resulted in significant concerns for the welfare of millions of pigs throughout the world...

    Intensive pig farming
  • Sow stalls

    In much of the world, pregnant sows are confined in metal crates or cages. They act like prisons, limiting the sows movement so that she cannot even turn around.

    Sow stalls
  • Barren conditions

    Inquisitive young pigs are often kept in barren, crowded conditions on slatted concrete floors without straw for bedding or rooting.

    Barren conditions
  • Tail docking

    Bored and frustrated, piglets turn to the only other ‘thing’ in their bare pens: the tails of other pigs. To prevent tail biting, farmers slice off (dock) part of the piglet’s tail.

    Tail docking
  • Injuries

    Poor living conditions lead to fighting amongst the pigs, sometimes causing severe injury.

    Injuries
  • Illegal cruelty

    Our investigators have found evidence of routine abuses of pig welfare across Europe, often in complete disregard of existing EU law. Sign the petition and say no to the suffering of EU pigs

    Illegal cruelty

Project Pig

Hundreds of millions of pigs around the world are kept in factory farms. Just under 1 billion animals in the world today are pigs. Over 500 million of these pigs live in industrialised systems, known as factory farms. Being kept in such intensive conditions has severe health and welfare implications for the animals involved.

Compassion in World Farming has campaigned for many years to ensure higher welfare standards for pigs. During this time we have seen vital steps forward, including the recognition of animals as sentient beings within the EU (Lisbon Treaty, 2009), and the passage of legislation such as Council Directive 2008/120/EC laying down minimum standards for the protection of pigs.

What we are doing: Project Pig

Getting sows out of stalls

Project Pig: Now Stalling on 2013 Ban

Project Pig is Compassion’s campaign to build on the legislative advances made within the EU, with specific regard to enforcing the Pigs Directive across Europe. Our initial emphasis was on the 2013 Sow Stall Ban, and Project Pig lobbied DEFRA, the European Commission, the European Parliament and EU Agriculture Ministers to stop some of the routine abuses of pig welfare and seek to ensure that all nations were fully compliant with the Sow Stall ban when it came into force on 1st Jan 2013. A number of countries continue to be non-compliant on this ban.

Enforcing European pig welfare law

We also monitor and make formal complaints to the European Commission regarding breaches of the Pigs Directive by EU countries which can result in these countries being taken to the European Court. In February 2013 the European Commission began infraction proceedings against 9 EU Member States for failing to be compliant with the ban. By January 2014 this number had fallen to 6 non-compliant Member States.

Between March 2013 and March 2014, 475,576 people signed our petition calling on every EU Agriculture Minister to ensure that their country complies fully with the EU Pigs Directive.

Over the coming years we will continue to press for 100% compliance with the sow stall ban whilst also seeking to ensure a reduction in routine tail docking of pigs produced in the EU, enforcement of the requirement regarding the provision of enrichment materials, and for the Commission to agree to full transparency on compliance levels with the Pigs Directive.

Help protect pigs from illegal cruelty

The EU Pigs Directive continues to be flouted by many Member States. Email Commissioner Borg now to ask him to act.

Take action

Timeline

Summer 2013

Croatia joins the EU

Croatia's level of Compliance with the Sow Stall ban is unknown (but presumed to not be fully compliant).
February 2013

Nine nations not compliant with sow stall ban

European Commission begins infraction proceedings against nine nations not compliant with sow stall ban
1 January 2013

EU sow stall ban takes effect

Use of sow stalls following the first four weeks of pregnancy banned in all 27 EU Member States
2009

EU Lisbon Treaty

Animals continue to be recognised as sentient beings in EU Lisbon Treaty
2007

Report shows routine tail docking continues

EFSA Report states that over 90% of pigs in the EU are tail-docked despite the practice of docking tails routinely having been illegal since 2003
2003

Routine tail docking banned in the EU

2001

EU sow stall ban

EU follows the example set by the UK (and Sweden and Luxembourg) and agrees a ban on sow stalls
1999

UK sow stall ban

UK bans sow stalls after campaign by Compassion in World Farming
1997

Animals recognised as sentient beings in EU law



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